Accuracy You Can Trust.

The accuracy of your patient’s meter matters more than you might think.

The American Diabetes Association considers self-monitoring of blood glucose to be an integral part of diabetes management.1 Maintaining blood glucose levels within a predefined range depends in part on the ability to obtain accurate readings.2

The CONTOUR® NEXT meter portfolio has demonstrated highly accurate results.

All meters are NOT the same.

All meters are not equally accurate. While standards have been established for strip-based blood-glucose monitoring systems (BGMS), substantial differences in accuracy exist between and within brands. 2,3


  • Currently, there may be meters still on the market with as much as a ±20% level of accuracy, as allowed per the ISO 15197:2003 standard4, which was recognized by the FDA until January 2014.5
  • According to current (2013) International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards, BGMS accuracy must be within ±15% of the reference measurement for samples with glucose concentrations >100 mg/dL, and within +15 mg/dL for glucose concentrations <100 mg/dL. 6
  • The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) 2014 draft guidance proposes that 95% of results should be within ±15% and 99% of results within ±20% of reference values across the entire glycemic range.5

The CONTOUR® NEXT meter portfolio has demonstrated highly accurate blood glucose results within 10% of laboratory reference values. 7-9

References:
1. American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes-2015. Diabetes Care. 2015;38(suppl 1):S1-S92.
2. Walsh J, Roberts R, Vigersky RA, et al. New criteria for assessing the accuracy of blood glucose monitors meeting, October 28, 2011. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2012;6(2):466-474
3. Budiman ES, Samant N, Resch A. Clinical implications and economic impact of accuracy differences among commercially available blood glucose monitoring systems. J Diabetes Sci Journal. 2013;7(2):365-380
4. ISO. In vitro diagnostic test systems—requirements for blood-glucose monitoring systems for self-testing in managing diabetes mellitus. ISO 15197:2003. Geneva: International Organization for Standardization; 2003.
5. Food and Drug Administration. Self-monitoring blood glucose test systems for over-the-counter use. Draft guidance for industry and Food and Drug Administration staff. Available from http://www.fda.govdownloads/MedicalDevices/DeviceRegulationandGuidance/Guidancedocuments/UCM380327.pdf. Accessed February 22, 2016.
6. International Organization for Standardization. In vitro diagnostic test systems—requirements for blood-glucose monitoring systems for self-testing in managing diabetes mellitus. ISO 15197:2013. Geneva: International Organization for Standardization; 2013.
7. Bernstein R, Parkes JL, Goldy A, et al. A new test strip technology platform for self-monitoring of blood glucose. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013;7(5):1386-1399.
8. Harrison B, Dunne N. Accuracy and precision evaluation of the CONTOUR.NEXT blood glucose monitoring system. Poster presented at: 12th Annual Meeting of the Diabetes Technology Society; November 8-10, 2012; Bethesda, MD.
9. Harrison B, Brown D, Warchal-Windham ME, et al. Accuracy evaluation of a new platform of blood glucose monitoring systems with the CONTOUR.NEXT test strip. Poster presented at: 12th Annual Meeting of the Diabetes Technology Society; November 8-10, 2012; Bethesda, MD.

Accuracy is key to consistent diabetes management.

Blood glucose monitor readings help detect hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, determine insulin doses, calibrate continuous glucose monitoring devices, and adjust diet and exercise.1 Therefore, meter accuracy is of utmost importance when self-monitoring diabetes.

Read more about the significance of meter accuracy. Download the clinical white paper “Blood Glucose Monitoring System Accuracy: Why It Matters.”

For more information about hypoglycemic risk and why accuracy matters more than you might think, download our "Accuracy Story – Fact Sheet #1".

For more information about accuracy and the CONTOUR® NEXT meter portfolio, download our "Accuracy is important – Fact Sheet #2".


Hypoglycemic events

  • By correctly detecting actual hypoglycemic events, they can be treated accurately and in a timely manner. 3
  • Accurate blood glucose readings provide the basis for patients to calculate and administer the appropriate insulin dose, thus preventing hypoglycemia. 3
  • Research shows that the higher the margin of error of a self-monitoring BGMS, the greater the predicted risk that hypoglycemic events could be missed, and thus inadequately treated. 4
  • At a 20% system error, the predicted risk of missing a hypoglycemic event is 1 in 10. However, for BGMS with only a 10% system error level, the predicted missed events drops greatly to fewer than 1 in 100.4


Figure 1. The probability for missing a reference hypoglycemic level of 60 mg/dL as a function of the error in self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG).4

How does accuracy affect insulin dosing?

A patient with an actual blood glucose level (that is, the reading that would be obtained under ideal laboratory conditions) of 360 mg/dL could appear as low as 288 mg/dL using a meter with -20% error margin, and as high as 432 mg/dL at an error margin of ±20%. This ±20% error margin could potentially lead a patient to take the wrong course of action to correct his/her blood sugar.4

Figure 2. Blood glucose readings shown are for example only, and refer to blood glucose results at or above 100 mg/dL per the ISO 15197:2013 standard.

The CONTOUR® NEXT meter portfolio's proven highly accurate results - within 10% of laboratory reference values5-7 – can help patients better manage their diabetes.

References:
1. American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes-2015. Diabetes Care. 2015;38(suppl 1):S1-S92.
2. Walsh J, Roberts R, Vigersky RA, et al. New criteria for assessing the accuracy of blood glucose monitors meeting, October 28, 2011. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2012;6(2):466-474
3. Budiman ES, Samant N, Resch A. Clinical implications and economic impact of accuracy differences among commercially available blood glucose monitoring systems. J Diabetes Sci Journal. 2013;7(2):365-380
4. Breton MD, Kovatchev BP. Impact of blood glucose self-monitoring errors on glucose variability, risk for hypoglycemia, and average glucose control in type 1 diabetes: an in silico study. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2010;4(3):562-570.
5. Bernstein R, Parkes JL, Goldy A, et al. A new test strip technology platform for self-monitoring of blood glucose. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013;7(5):1386-1399.
6. Harrison B, Dunne N. Accuracy and precision evaluation of the CONTOUR® NEXT blood glucose monitoring system. Poster presented at: 12th Annual Meeting of the Diabetes Technology Society; November 8-10, 2012; Bethesda, MD.
7. Harrison B, Brown D, Warchal-Windham ME, et al. Accuracy evaluation of a new platform of blood glucose monitoring systems with the CONTOUR® NEXT test strip. Poster presented at: 12th Annual Meeting of the Diabetes Technology Society; November 8-10, 2012; Bethesda, MD.

The CONTOUR® NEXT Difference: Accuracy you can trust!

Accuracy of a patient's BGMS can reduce their risk of having a hypoglycemic event, minimize errors in insulin dosing, and even impact economic outcomes such as direct and indirect healthcare costs. 3-6

The CONTOUR® NEXT meter portfolio has demonstrated highly accurate blood glucose results within 10% of laboratory reference values. 7-9

CONTOUR® NEXT Meter Radar Plot

Radar plots are a new method of visualizing the accuracy and precision of BGMS. Resembling a target, a tight clustering of data points in the center of the plot represents higher accuracy and precision.10 The radar plot pictured here demonstrates the tight correlation between laboratory values and values obtained using the CONTOUR® NEXT blood glucose monitoring system.

  • Each data point on the radar plot represents the error of a meter system result.
  • The distance from the center of the plot to a data point indicates the magnitude of the meter system error.
  • The direction of a line connecting the point to the center indicates the value of the laboratory reference measurement.
  • When the point is above the horizontal midline, the error is positive (i.e., the meter overestimated the laboratory reference blood glucose value). If the point is below the horizontal midline, the error is negative (i.e., the meter underestimated the laboratory reference blood glucose value). 10

For more detail about accuracy of the CONTOUR® NEXT portfolio, download our “Radar Plot Fact Sheet”.

Recommend the CONTOUR® NEXT meter portfolio to your patients today, for accuracy they can trust.

References:
1. American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes-2015. Diabetes Care. 2015;38(suppl 1):S1-S92.
2. Walsh J, Roberts R, Vigersky RA, et al. New criteria for assessing the accuracy of blood glucose monitors meeting, October 28, 2011. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2012;6(2):466-474
3. Budiman ES, Samant N, Resch A. Clinical implications and economic impact of accuracy differences among commercially available blood glucose monitoring systems. J Diabetes Sci Journal. 2013;7(2):365-380
4. Raine CH 3rd, Schrock LE, Edelman SV, et al. significant insulin dose errors may occur if blood glucose results are obtained from miscoded meters. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2007;1(2):205-210
5. Curkendall SM, Zhang B, Oh KS, et al. Incidence and cost of hypoglycemia among patients with type 2 diabetes in the United States: analysis of a health insurance database. J Clin Outcomes Manage. 2011;18(10):455-462
6. Quilliam BJ, Simeone JC, Ozbay AB, Kogut SJ. The incidence and costs of hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes. Am J Manag Care. 2011;17(10):673-680
7. Bernstein R, Parkes JL, Goldy A, et al. A new test strip technology platform for self-monitoring of blood glucose. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2013;7(5):1386-1399.
8. Harrison B, Dunne N. Accuracy and precision evaluation of the CONTOUR® NEXT blood glucose monitoring system. Poster presented at: 12th Annual Meeting of the Diabetes Technology Society; November 8-10, 2012; Bethesda, MD.
9. Harrison B, Brown D, Warchal-Windham ME, et al. Accuracy evaluation of a new platform of blood glucose monitoring systems with the CONTOUR® NEXT test strip. Poster presented at: 12th Annual Meeting of the Diabetes Technology Society; November 8-10, 2012; Bethesda, MD.
10. Simmons DA. How should blood glucose meter system analytical performance be assessed? J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2015;10(1):178-184.